Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome 

When you hear CVS what do you think? If you are like most you probably think of the big box pharmacy. And you wouldn’t be alone in this. That’s what most would think. However, if you have CVS or know someone who suffers from it, that is not the first thing that comes to mind. You would probably think of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome. What is that you ask!? We will discuss that in today’s post. We will look at what CVS is, what the symptoms are, what the treatment is.  And we will get the perspective of a CVS patient. Let’s not waste anymore time. Let’s just jump right in. 

According to the National Institute of Health, Cyclic vomiting syndrome, sometimes referred to as CVS, is an increasingly recognized disorder with sudden, repeated attacks—also called episodes—of severe nausea, vomiting, and physical exhaustion that occur with no apparent cause. The episodes can last from a few hours to several days.  Wow that sounds great right?  No, okay you are right. It’s miserable. Absolutely 100% miserable for those who suffer from it. Many who suffer from this struggle to find triggers. Meaning they can’t pinpoint what causes it so the can reduce the number of attacks they have. So they will vomit everything they try to consume for hours or days. It’s the a stomach bug on steroids. It often hits fast and without much warning and depending on the attack like said above can last for hour, days or even longer.  This may cause the person to have to stay in bed and miss work or school for long periods. And the person suffering may even have to seek medical treatment for IV fluids or other methods of treatment. Which we will discuss later. 

How many people suffer from CVS? The exact number is unknown. But according to the NIH it is estimated that it could affect 4 to 2,000 per 100,000 children. The condition is diagnosed most often in children, although there have been some recent studies that suggest that the condition may begin in adulthood as commonly as it begins in childhood. 

So what causes Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome? Sadly, the exact cause of CVS is unknown. But experts believe there are some things that can contribute to the disease.  Some of these conditions as listed by the NIH are as follows: gastrointestinal motility which is the way food moves through the digestive system. Or moves at a slow pace through the digestive system. A persons central nervous system function, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and nerves that control bodily responses.  A persons autonomic nervous system function, which is the nerves that control internal organs such as the heart. Or the person may have hormone imbalances. It is also thought that it’s possible that an abnormal inherited gene may also contribute to the condition.  

There are also triggers that can cause an attack of CVS.  Here are just a few: emotional stress, anxiety, or panic attacks, infections, eating certain foods, like chocolate, cheese, or additives such as caffeine, nitrites which are commonly found in cured meats such as hot dogs, and MSG. Other triggers could include: hot weather, menstrual periods, motion sickness, overeating, fasting, or eating right before bedtime or physical exhaustion or too much exercise. So basically, after looking at the list of triggers, it’s possibk that just about anything can trigger an attack. 

What are the symptoms of CVS? The most common symptoms are severe vomiting that occurs several times per hour and lasts less than one week. And also three or more separate episodes of vomiting with no apparent cause in the past year.  A person with CVS may also experience abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, dizziness, and even sensitivity to light. These symptoms may lead to dehydration which can be a life threatening condition. 

So now we know what CVS looks like and what causes it. But the more important question is what can be done to treat a person who is experiencing a CVS attack or flare. There is sadly no cure at this time. So treatment is more symptom management.  A person with CVS may be given anti-nausea meds, sedatives, medicines that suppress stomach acid, or antidepressants.  A person may be given meds that are used to treat migraines. Those meds can be helpful in treating or preventing a CVS attack. 

When I spoke with Melissa Kline, a CVS patient she gave me some insight into what it’s like to live with this condition. She stated that she has been able to learn what  her triggers are.  For her Benlysta (which she receives as treatment for her lupus!) and stress are the big two things that will almost always trigger an attack. She states that some patients can catch their episodes early with anti nausea meds, while others end up in the ER to be given enough medication to mildly sedate them. She said that sedating a cvs patient is kind of like a reset button. By hitting that “reset button” they can slow or stop the symptoms, and give the patient a break. Many times she and other CVS patients end up in the ER due to dehydration. So they are treated with IV Fluids and meds to control the nausea so they are able to stop vomiting. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome is a horrible and challenging disorder and no one should have to deal with it. She is hoping that they are able to find better treatments and a cure in the coming years as more awareness is brought to the condition. She also suggested that anyone who has the condition or thinks they might visit cvsaonline.org. 

So help us bring awareness by sharing this article after you read it. 

-Amber

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cyclic-vomiting-syndrome/basics/symptoms/con-20028160

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/cyclic-vomiting-syndrome

Home

Leave a Reply