What is Sjogrens?

Sjogrens…… How many of you know what that word means or is? According to Mayo Clinic, Sjogren’s (SHOW-grins) syndrome is a disorder of the immune system which is identified the two most common symptoms: dry eyes and a dry mouth. Sjogren’s syndrome is often found in those with other immune system disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. In this blog post we will look at what Sjogrens is, how many are affected, the symptoms and how it is treated. April is Sjogrens awareness month so that’s what I want to do. Bring awareness to this condition  

Although you can develop Sjogren’s syndrome at any age, most people are older than 40 at the time of diagnosis. The condition is much more common in women. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms. It has been estimated that approximately 1 in 272 people will be diagnosed with Sjogrens. That’s abou 1 million people in USA. Researches few that there are an estimated 2 million people that have Sjogrens and are undiagnosed.  Son experts believe that 1 to 4 million people have the disease worldwide. 

In a person who has Sjogrens syndrome, their mucous membranes and moisture-secreting glands of the eyes and mouth are usually affected first. Reaulting in decreased production of tears and saliva. This leading to dry eyes and mouth. Sjögren’s also can affect other parts of the body. Including the skin, joints, lungs, kidneys, blood vessels, digestive organs, and nerves. Symptoms other than dry eyes and mouth can be: dry skin, skin rashes, a chronic dry cough, problems with the thyroid, joint and muscle pain, Vaginal dryness, as well as numbness/tingling in the arms and legs.

At this point the exact cause of Sjögren’s syndrome is unknown. However it is thought by many that it may be caused by a combination of two things: genetic predisposition, or exposure to something like a virus or bacteria.

How is Sjogrens diagnosed? There are several different ways that this condition can be diagnosed. Your doctor may order blood tests to check for: they are looking for levels of different types of blood cells. Along with The presence of antibodies common in Sjögren’s syndrome. They are also looking for presence of inflammatory conditions or any indication of problems with the liver or kidneys in the blood. The dr may also order eye tests to measure the dryness of the eyes. They also may ordering some imaging to look at the functions of the patients salivary glands. Or maybe a lip biopsy to look for the presence of clusters of inflammatory cells, which would indicate Sjogren’s syndrome. 

Now that we have looked at the cause, the symptoms and how the condition is diagnosed. Let’s look at how the condition can be treated. Treatment for this conditions is based almost primarily on symptoms. There are several different medications that can be prescribed to treat Sjogrens. 

The dr may want you to try something that will help increase your production of saliva. Drugs such as pilocarpine (Salagen) and cevimeline (Evoxac) can increase the production of saliva, and sometimes tears. S

Othe medications that could be given  toaddress a specific complications that you might develop. If you develop arthritis type symptoms, they might suggest nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or other arthritis medications. Prescription eyedrops can be given if you don’t respond to over-the-counter drops. Should you develop a Yeast infection in your mouth, they can be treated with antifungal medications.

Due to the fact that Sjogrens is categorized with other autoimmune conditions. Your dr might decide to treat your symptoms with Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), a drug designed to treat malaria, is often helpful in treating Sjogren’s syndrome. Also, any drugs that suppress the immune system, such as methotrexate might also be given. 

Help me bring awareness by sharing this blog post with others. So that one day there can be a cure found!

-Amber
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sjogrens-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20020275

http://www.rightdiagnosis.com/s/sjogrens_syndrome/stats.htm

https://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/sjogrens_syndrome/sjogrens_syndrome_ff.asp

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