How Having a Routine Can Be Beneficial

Are you one of those people who need a routine in your life?!? Do you plan out your day, every day? Do you obsess about making sure you accomplish everything on your list?!? I used to be one of those people. Especially when I was working, I would plan out my day at work and then plan my week around the things I needed to get done. But since I’ve gotten sick my routines have gone out the window!! I know I can’t be the only one who has experienced this! Even though it is hard, it is important to find a way to keep some routine even when you are chronically ill.

When you are living with a chronic illness, nothing about your life is certain. Symptoms come and go daily, weekly or even hourly on bad days. Changes in your schedule are common due to having to cancel things or rearrange your day because of your symptoms. Due to the fact that nothing in the life of a person who has a chronic illness is promised or set in stone. However, it is essential to find a way to keep a routine.

Is having a routines the same as having a schedule? No!! A schedule is defined by dictionary.com as a series of things that need to be done or events to occur at or during time or period; a time table. While a routine is defined as common tasks, chores, or duties that need to be done regularly or at specific intervals; typical or everyday activities. The big difference between having a schedule that you stick to, versus having a routine is the time factor! A schedule requires you to do specific activities at specific times. Where a routine is a set of activities that are generally done regularly, but not at a specific time. You can think of it this way. A schedule tasks that need to be done at a specific times. Like going to a drs appointment! While a routine are things that you do habitually, things you do pretty much every day. An example of a routine would be brushing your teeth every night before you go to bed!

A schedule is important for kids bc they need the structure. But do adults benefit from having a schedule like kiddos? Yes, the average adults does. But, adults with chronic illness DO NOT get the same benefits from living by a schedule. Living with a chronic illness means that we have to learn to deal with the unexpected changes in plans. These changes are common for the chronically ill, not because we don’t want to do things, but because our bodies won’t allow us to do those things. You may be hit with anxiety or depression, or even a flare which may occur without any warning. These are the things that make living by a Schedule almost impossible at times.

Routines are very beneficial to those living with a chronic illness. A routine is like having a schedule but without time constraints. Having a routine can help you get more quality sleep which is an essential for those with chronic illness. It is also beneficial because it will help you remember to take your medications and supplements when they are due.

What are other benefits of living by a routine? A routine provides you with the ability to come more EFFICIENT. By keeping a routine it creates a structure of our day to day tasks. A routine also reduces the need to make certain decisions. Thus you can save time planning and you have extra room for things that might come up Unexpectedly. A routine can also BUILD CONFIDENCE. Sticking to a routine gives a person a huge sense of satisfaction, and helps to build ones self-Confidence. Having a routine can also REDUCE STRESS. Which is important for those with chronic illness as stress can cause a flare of any condition. By having the routine is gives you more flexibility to be able to deal with issues that may pop up. Thus knowing you have tings under control will significantly lower a person’s stress and enabling them to focus on other things that need to be done.

We all have a routine that we keep. Mine for instance in the morning is to get up, stop off in the bathroom and then get some breakfast and take my morning meds. After that I spend time catching up on social media and looking at emails. This is just an example of my morning routine. This routine ensures that I take my medications that I need. If I falter from that routine I will forget something.

If you are able to establish a routine and try to stick to it everyday no matter how you feel then in the long run you may actually feel better. If your body knows that you are going to get up and eat and then stretch and take a walk, your body won’t revolt as much when you try and do those things. Your routine also helps you conserve energy because you can adjust your activities so you may be able to get out and do the things you have scheduled and not have to cancel them so often. Having a routine may make you seem more credible to your friends and family. Which may ease any conflict you may have with those people over your canceling plans. So living by a routine is the best way for the chronically ill to live their lives.

If you feel like you need some extra help figuring out your routine and getting it set up there are a ton of apps that can help you. You can simply download them in your smart phone or tablet. They can help you scheduling, prioritizing and even relaxing. Below is a picture from the Apple store that I found doing a search of “Routine.” The ones I chose to show you had the best reviews of al the ones I found. I hope this is helpful.

With Love,

Amber

2 thoughts on “How Having a Routine Can Be Beneficial”

  1. So very true. There are days I can literally not move when I wake up in the mornings! However, I know I have to work, so I get ready for work, take morning meds and trudge on. I may be slow, but I do My best😀

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